Our Mission
To transform the quality of life for all citizens who live, work and play in East Baton Rouge Parish by returning blighted properties to productive use, fostering redevelopment through facilitating partnerships, and creating a vibrant, globally competitive community while preserving character of place.
 

Background
The East Baton Rouge Redevelopment Authority (RDA) was created by the 2007 Louisiana Legislature. We are governed by a five-member Board ofCommissioners, appointed by the Mayor-President, Baton Rouge Area Foundation, and Baton Rouge Area Chamber. Our goals are to transform the quality of life for all citizens; foster redevelopment in disinvested areas; facilitate partnerships; create a vibrant, competitive community; and preserve and enhance sense of place.

The RDA began operations in February 2009 with the following priorities for its first year:
• Organizational development;
• Funding;

• Project development; and
• Community engagement and partnership building.


With these goals and priorities in mind, we carefully assembled a staff of twelve, and canvassed the Parish to view underserved areas and gain a better understanding of citizens’ visions, concerns, and priorities. This on-the-ground research revealed critical needs in our community that we started to address in the our first three years, such as attainable housing, gap financing, home and small business rehabilitation, brownfields redevelopment, and neighborhood planning. Together with our citizens and elected officials, we will continue to build a better East Baton Rouge Parish.
 

RDA Business Plan
Click Here

Bylaws & Budget
Bylaws
2013 Budget
2012 Budget
2011 Budget

Amended 2010 Budget
2010 Budget


Legislation
Signed Act No. 45 (HB697)
Signed Act No. 417 (HB 876)



about the rda
who we are
how we work
where we work
resources
recent news
contact
partners
for residents
for business
for developers
ebrcde
home

 
 
The EBR Redevelopment Authority
fosters a proactive redevelopment environment designed to reverse the current patterns of disinvestment, abandonment, and outward migration contributing to the overall decline of the urban center.  Leading the rebuilding effort, the RDA has established a framework for program delivery primed to produce successful outcomes of stakeholder participation, catalyzed economic activity, and public/private investment in underserved areas.

COMMUNITY IMPROVEMENT PLANS

The RDA and its consultant team
worked for eighteen months to create Community Improvement Plans for five districts within East Baton Rouge Parish, including Choctaw Corridor, Northdale, Melrose East, Scotlandville Gateway, and Zion City & Glen Oaks. The plans are community-driven with residents and other stakeholders providing input for guiding the future reinvestment and development in their communities to ensure that redevelopment efforts are sustainable and in keeping with each respective community’s needs, character, and vision, as determined through discussions between the RDA, elected officials, and community stakeholders. In addition, the plans deliver action-oriented strategies that identify opportunities for reinvestment back into the community, while building upon the momentum of other revitalization efforts currently underway.

Please click on the links below to learn more about the individual plans.

Scotlandville

Zion City & Glen Oaks

Northdale & Standard Heights
Choctaw Corridor

Melrose East






REAL ESTATE

The mission of the Real Estate department
is to eliminate blight; the amount of creativity to achieve this has no boundaries. Rising costs and sometimes insurmountable legal barriers are found on many parcels within the city limits of Baton Rouge. In efforts to address these issues, the RDA, through its legislation, has the ability to acquire and quickly clear title to tax sale and adjudicated properties. Whether working with a developer to assemble land to make way for new development or partnering with non-profit organizations to fulfill its mission, the RDA is proud to participate in the reduction of blight. 

Property Evaluation Tool Land Banking


ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT

Our efforts in economic development seek
to improve the quality of life and economic situation of the East Baton Rouge community through stimulating reinvestment by investors and developers and by facilitating the renewal of the neighborhood retail and commercial corridors. In essence, we are fulfilling our mission as the Redevelopment Authority: to address market failures with resources that are otherwise unavailable in the community.

The program incentives in the RDA toolbox target areas for existing and new business development, for attracting new business and residents, and for creating and retaining jobs. There is unquestionable opportunity for existing businesses to capture more of the sales dollar – which results in more tax revenue - through business development and growth, with the double impact of catalyzing the renewal of surrounding distressed neighborhoods.

Business Improvement Grant

Gap Finance for Commercial Development
New Markets Tax Credits

The Fresh Food Initiative




HOUSING DEVELOPMENT

Supporting new construction and rehabilitation of affordable rental and owner-occupied housing
remains a primary, mission-driven focus of the RDA.
According to the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development “a family with one full-time worker earning the minimum wage cannot afford the local fair-market rent for a two-bedroom apartment anywhere in the United States.”  In East Baton Rouge Parish, the median household income is approximately $46,000, yet within the target areas in the CIPs, median household income drops by half. Research found a deficiency of over 1,500 affordable units, especially concentrated in our target areas. This all presents a challenge to families and individuals seeking safe and affordable housing.


Gap Finance for Affordable Housing Development  


COMMUNITY IMPACT

To continue to fulfill our mission and address community needs,
we will focus on strategic initiatives that aim to construct high-quality, mixed-income housing units, improve the public realm and private storefronts along prominent thoroughfares, create job opportunities, and return problem properties to productive use.